E5ItjSfWQAIEnpa

Framework for Diabetes in Canada

eAwaz Health

Ottawa – On February 27, 2020, Member of Parliament Sonia Sidhu (Liberal – Ontario) introduced Bill C-237, which required the Minister of Health, in consultation with stakeholders, to develop a framework designed to support improved access to diabetes prevention and treatment to ensure better health outcomes for Canadians.

The National Framework for Diabetes Act received Royal Assent on June 29, 2021.

In Budget 2021, the Government announced $35 million over five years, starting in 2021-22, for diabetes research (including Type 1 diabetes), surveillance and prevention, and to work towards the development of a framework for diabetes.

The Framework for Diabetes in Canada (the Framework) has been developed in accordance with the National Framework for Diabetes Act. The Act requires the Minister of Health — in consultation with representatives of the provincial and territorial governments responsible for health, Indigenous groups, and other relevant stakeholders — to develop a national framework designed to support improved access to diabetes prevention and treatment to ensure better health outcomes for Canadians.

The Act requires the Minister of Health to prepare a report setting out the Framework within one year of the Act coming into force as well as a report in Parliament within five years on the effectiveness of the Framework, and on the current state of diabetes prevention and treatment.

The Framework aims to provide a common policy direction to address diabetes in Canada, and lays the foundation for collaborative and complementary action by all sectors of society.

Engagement process

As part of these efforts, the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), with the assistance of the Morris J. Wosk Centre for Dialogue at Simon Fraser University, undertook a virtual engagement process from February to May 2022. In the process, a range of key stakeholders had an opportunity to share their views, experiences and perspectives to help identify priorities for advancing efforts on diabetes in Canada, and to inform the development of the Framework.

The engagement process consisted of key informant interviews with diabetes stakeholders, followed by dialogue sessions with groups of stakeholders to identify and discuss challenges related to diabetes, opportunities for collaboration and action, and ideas for a national framework. An online feedback tool allowed stakeholders to voice concerns and identify gaps and priorities to help advance diabetes efforts.

PHAC also sought input from provinces and territories through three federal, provincial and territorial (FPT) mechanisms: the FPT Group on Nutrition; the FPT Group on Sport, Physical Activity and Recreation; and the FPT Health Support Committee, which reports to the FPT Deputy Ministers of Health.

Two advisory groups were established to provide input: an Internal Advisory Group on

Diabetes, comprised of relevant federal departments; and an External Advisory Group on Diabetes, comprised of key diabetes-related stakeholders, including Diabetes Canada and Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF).

While the Framework incorporates the perspectives of several Indigenous stakeholders, a broader nation-wide engagement process with First Nations, Inuit and Metis organizations and communities is being led by the National Indigenous Diabetes

Association from June 2022 to March 2023. Outcomes are expected to be included in the five year report to Parliament in 2027, as required by the Act.